Category: Parish Nurse

03/22/2019: March Parish Nurse Update

Hello friends,

I wanted to share some recent experiences and perhaps get some of you thinking.  This past weekend, my husband Kent and I celebrated our wedding anniversary.  At one point, during a delicious meal of “bangers and mash,” I swallowed a piece of sausage (banger) the wrong way.  And by swallowed the wrong way, I mean actually that I didn’t swallow it but it became firmly lodged in my airway.  

It’s amazing how fast and yet slow things moved for me in the next few seconds. I coughed and tried to drink water, andthen couldn’t cough. Training took over and I stood up and moved to the edge of the table so that my husband could position himself more easily to help me.  And then when I couldn’t breathe, I used the universal sign for choking, with hands around my throat.  And one-two-three, pop!  Kent, a trained first-responder, performed three textbook perfect abdominal thrusts, cleared my airway, and I gathered myself together to notice a table across from us with several young men clapping and giving Kent the thumbs up.  Apparently, they were all off-duty firefighters. I was fortunate to be in a safe area, with many well-trained people able to help.  

Last week, during a visit with my parents, my father told me of one of his friends who experienced sudden cardiac arrest in an airport.  A bystander (who was an RN), grabbed the automated external defibrillator (AED) off the wall of the airport and performed CPR with automatic defibrillation.  My father’s friend lived and is doing well.  

The summer before we moved to Washington, I went on a “girl’s weekend” with my best friend Maggie, her wife and their two girls. The youngest at that point was only 8 or 9 months old.  While sitting in the living room, surrounded by adults, that little one somehow managed to get a small clear piece of plastic in her mouth.  She turned the classic shades of red, and then blue in rapid succession.  I cleared her airway in another “training over emotions” moment that seemed to take an eternity.  

So my thoughts this month for you are these. Is this, perhaps, a skill you have to offer the world? Have you taken a CPR class in the past, but don’t really remember much anymore?  Are you worried you’ll “do it wrong?” Have you ever helped someone with a medical emergency, or perhaps, like me this weekend, been on the receiving end of some skilled assistance? This knowledge can be a beautiful way to nurture our interdependent web of life. And if you aren’t able physically to perform CPR, can you advocate for others around you to consider receiving training?

Training in CPR includes techniques in clearing airway obstruction, and using an AED; this is priceless knowledge. Here locally there are so many resources for receiving training or refreshing your training. Currently, the Central Kitsap Fire department offers free community CPR classes on the 3rd Thursday of every month. https://www.ckfr.org/information/cpr-classes/

As our fellowship embraces goals around safety, I hope you will please let me know if you would like further information on training in CPR, first-aid, or have any questions.  

Be well,

Jennifer Ingalls, RN
nurse@kuuf.org

The KUUF Parish Nurse

What services does our volunteer, part-time Parish Nurse offer at KUUF?
● Information-sharing for optimizing health and well-being
● Good-Samaritan emergency response to an accident or sudden illness IF she is present
● On-the-spot assessment and referral for abuse or risk of suicide
● Maintenance of the church first-aid kit
● Involvement in disaster planning for the faith community
● Upon request: provide referrals, accompaniment to appointments, supportive visits, blood pressure checks, and assistance with advanced care planning.

When might I contact the parish nurse?
● When you have a doctor’s appointment and you are not sure what questions to ask or want someone to accompany you.
● When your blood pressure has been running high and you want it checked.
● When you or a loved one has a chronic disease and you are looking for resources.
● When you or a loved one are discharged from the hospital and have questions on how to cope.
● When you decide to make lifestyle changes, such as smoking cessation, diet change, or exercise, and you need resources and encouragement.
● When you have an idea for an educational program you think might be of benefit to the fellowship.
● When you or a loved one would like to complete an advanced directive
and need resources and support.

What services does the Parish Nurse not offer?
● Medical diagnoses or prescription medication
● Injections, laboratory tests, wound care, or other care that requires direction by a physician or other advanced-practice provider
● Care that would otherwise be provided by a home health or hospice agency


May the Parish Nurse provide services to minors (under age 18)?
Under Washington State law:
● Age 13 is the age of consent for mental health treatment, age 14 is the age of consent for testing & treatment of sexually-transmitted infections, there is NO minimum age of consent for reproductive health services.
● Therefore, the Parish Nurse may talk to minors who have concerns about
mental health, STI’s, contraception or pregnancy – with or without a parent present.
● If a parent is not present, the nurse will notify a parent that a conversation occurred, but will reveal no further information unless there’s danger of harm to the minor or others. Any meeting without a parent will occur in a public setting.


How does a member or friend of the fellowship contact the Parish Nurse?
● In person at the church
● By phone message at (916) 223-6880 (this phone is fingerprint
and password protected and calls and messages are confidential)
● By e-mail message at nurse@kuuf.org


Is the Parish Nurse available 24/7?
● As a part-time volunteer, she is not available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
● She checks and returns phone and e-mail messages regularly – usually within 24 hours.
● When she is not available for more than a day or two, she will let the congregation know.

What is a Parish Nurse?
● A Parish Nurse (Faith Community Nurse) is a licensed Registered Nurse who has completed the Fundamentals of Faith Community Nursing course.

Who is our Parish Nurse?
● Jennifer Ingalls, a Registered Nurse with a Master of Science in Nursing
● Her background includes oncology, nursing education, vascular access, infusion therapy, and volunteer work in breastfeeding medicine, maternal/child, school nursing and summer camp nursing.


What is the philosophy of Parish Nursing?
● Parish nursing is a nursing specialty focusing on health promotion and disease prevention.
● It uses a holistic center of care, attending to physical, mental, and
spiritual needs.
● Parish nursing is also called Faith Community Nursing.
● Parish nursing services are designed to work within the inter-dependent web of our faith community, guided by our faith tradition, covenant, and personal values.

Parish Nurse Update 01/03/2019

New Year’s greetings from your parish nurse,

I hope all of you are healthy and warm after what is often a busy and tiring month for many.  I’m writing to offer a reminder of how any of you can reach me for information, a referral, to set up a visit, or to ask a question.  My phone (which is fingerprint and password protected) is (916) 223-6880, and my email is nurse@kuuf.org

I will be available after this Sunday’s service, and after *almost* all upcoming services for any questions you may have.  If you’d like a blood pressure screening, help completing an advanced directive, or have questions you’d like to ask in private, we can arrange that easily.

My original plan for this letter was a brief “wellness and encouragement letter,” during this most germ-ridden time of the year.  I had wanted to offer some encouragement about self-care, staying hydrated, and generally being good to ourselves.  But my plans changed yesterday, when I found out that a nurse colleague of mine took his own life over the holidays.  This was a brilliant, dedicated, compassionate, well-trained nurse, and his loss has rocked the team of the hospital where I worked from 2009-2017.  And as I move through my own complex feelings about this loss, I asked myself, what, if anything, can I do now?

I no longer live in the same area as this nurse, so I can’t easily offer concrete assistance to his family and three small children.  I can’t give a hug to my colleagues who knew him very well, or lend a listening ear to them.  What I can do is offer a hug and a listening ear to all of you.  And offer encouragement that you check in on your friends and family and offer the same.  Feel free to reach out to me, to a member of the Caring Committee, the Listening Team, and of course, Rev. Jessica.  We are your beloved community.

I’d also like to share a resource.  The National Suicide Hotline is a 24/7 free service, with a 1-800 number. 1-800-273-8255  This service is also available for the deaf and hard-of-hearing via TDD, and also via chat on their website, https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/  I would encourage those of you who don’t feel you need this resource to save it into your phone anyway, so that one day you have it handy to share with someone who might need it.

So, in closing, Take care of yourselves, and know you are loved, important, and so valued.

With care,

Jennifer Ingalls, RN
Parish Nurse